“And with joy you shall draw forth water from the fountain of salvation!” Isaiah 12:3

Welcome

Kehilat Beta Yisrael




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CALENDER OF IMPORTANT FEASTS: Kehilat Beta Yisrael Holidays 5782

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For attending the festival you must call to reserve. For further details please call or send us an e-mail

Summary


About KBY

We are young and dynamic community We are young and dynamic community of believers whose uniqueness is that we’re both Jew and the nations who are bound together in the worship and praise of the One and only Creator, the G-d of Avraham, Yitzhak and Yaakov, the H-ly One of Yisrael (blessed is He) in light of the love of our Moshiach Yeshua through the traditions and customs of the Torah with central theme of “Teshuvah”.

And as Isaiah Hanavi said “Also the sons of the stranger, that join themselves to the LORD, to serve him, and to love the name of the LORD, to be his servants, every one that keepeth the sabbath from polluting it, and taketh hold of my covenant. Even them will I bring to my holy mountain, and make them joyful in my house of prayer: their burnt offerings and their sacrifices shall be accepted upon mine altar; for mine house shall be called a house of prayer for all people”. (Is. 56:6-7)

Who We Are?

Linking the two sides. We’re groups of Jews and the Nations that worship in togetherness of spirit the G-d of our fore fathers, G-d of Abraham, Isaac and Yaakov, the H-ly One of Yisrael blessed be He. We believe that the H-ly One (Blessed be He) in His awesomeness has reveal His rules, regulations and guardians into the hearts of all men after the floods of Noah which is the basic laws that all men should live by, this guardians is commonly called Noahide laws.

On the other hand we see the ladder of holiness or ladder of intimate relationship through Yaakov’s dream that the H-ly One (blessed be He), He’s reveling his revelation constantly and calling everyone into a higher level of intimate relationship with Him and NOT religion but rather RELATIONSHIP. So therefore everyman if only willing possessed the ability to climb step by step up this ladder of h-liness and righteousness into an intimate, personal relationship and to become g-dlike or rather to be the mirror reflection of G-d in a closer relationship with the G-d Head.

As the H-ly One (blessed be He) called our fathers from the Nations to bring them a step higher and closer to Himself in the ladder of relationship and by choosing Yaakov over Esau making Yisrael the Light bearer and given us the 10 words to guardYisrael, a witness of the Great Light of consciousness.

So did Adonai took a tribe from the 12 tribes of Yisrael which is Levi and He draw them closer to Himself a step higher than the rest of the tribes in the ladder of intimate relationship with Him. Then the H-ly One (blessed be He) took the Kohath family from the tribe of Levi to bring them a step higher in the ladder of intimate relationship with Him.

The H-ly One (blessed be He) went further by taking a Man from the sons of Amram, Moshe to bring him a further step higher in the ladder of intimate relationship with Him together with his brother Aaron to be his spokesman who later became the High priest.

The H-ly One (blessed be He) went further by taking a Man from the sons of Amram, Moshe to bring him a further step higher in the ladder of intimate relationship with Him together with his brother Aaron to be his spokesman who later became the High priest.

The uniqueness of Kehilat Beta Yisrael is bringing the nations the sons of Noah to be engraved in the tree of the commonwealth of Yisrael and a step by step higher in the ladder of personal and intimate relationship with the G-d of our forefathers Abraham, Yitzhak and Yaakov.

At Kehilat Beta Yisrael everyone has the freedom to grow up or rather climb this ladder of intimate relationship one step at a time and at your own space with the basic guardian been the 7 laws of Noah which the Creator has written in the heart of all men and if you desire and willing to grow more by taking upon yourself more responsibilities to clamp higher up the ladder of intimacy in relationship with the H-ly One then glory be to Him.

At Kehilat Beta Yisrael everyone has the freedom to grow up or rather climb this ladder of intimate relationship one step at a time and at your own space with the basic guardian been the 7 laws of Noah which the Creator has written in the heart of all men and if you desire and willing to grow more by taking upon yourself more responsibilities to clamp higher up the ladder of intimacy in relationship with the H-ly One then glory be to Him.

Our Vision

Our vision is to be the light that shines in darkness by proclaiming freedom and liberty in relationship with the H-ly One (blessed be He) over slavery and bondage of religion.

Our Purpose

The purpose of KBY is to bring both Jews and Non-Jews together in oneness of spirit in the public worship of G-d according to the teaching, guardian and the principles of the Torah.

Torah Teaching

Video Blog
Worship / Avodah

Erev Shabbat: Every Friday after Sunset

Shabbat Morning Service. Commence exactly @10:30am every Saturday


Music / Dance ministries / Liturgy / Torah / Bible Study

KBY welcome everyone who has gift/love for music and dance to the worship ministries as it’s been formed currently and once formed we'll not allow everyone to dance with the worship team during service. Please understand that the ministry of dance is a Spirit-led one which also requires practice and commitment. If you would like to dance, please speak with the Dance Worship leader about joining the team.


Rabbi Drash




Parshas Mishpatim 5782

'The Laws is an act of LOVE from God.'

27 Shevat 5782 / Jan. 29, Sat. 2022

By Rabbi Yitzhak Avraam

We have just been at Sinai. Amid thunder and lightning God has revealed the Decalogue (canon, code, constitution, law), which includes some major theological and moral principles by which one should live.

Synopsis: God teaches Moses a basic law code including rules of slaves, a list of capital crimes, rules of damages, and basic rules for courts. The families of Israel accept these laws.

Looking at the Rashi of the week: Mishpatim: The last verse of Parachat Yitro is: You shall not ascend the ramp up to my altar such that you expose your nakedness on the way up [Ex. 20.23]. this week’s sidrah begins: And these are the Mishpatim (Judgments). Rashi asks: Why does the Torah juxtapose these two verses? What are we supposed to learn by going from altars to courtrooms? This is to teach us that the Sanhedrin needs to be placed next to the altar, Beit Din near a Beit Knesset, because a courtroom must be as much of a place to meet God as is the sanctuary (Mekhilta).

By contrast, this week’s Torah portion includes many detailed mishpatim-judicial rulings. We hear about slaves and homicide, personal damage, bailments and theft, the bride price and sacrifices to other gods, ill treatment of strangers, widows, orphans and the poor, giving testimony in court-indeed, a whole potpourri (assortment · blend · collection · combination) of subjects. This is not the world of establishing fundamental relationships with God and the broad principles that should govern them; it is rather the world of the nitty-gritty (basics, core, essence) rules necessary to make society run well.

In the Mekhilta, one of the earliest Rabbinic commentaries, though, the rabbis note that this week’s Torah reading begins, And these are the judicial rulings that you shall set before them. The “And,” according to the rabbis, means that just as the Decalogue was revealed at Sinai to the people Israel with the full authority of God, so, too, all of the specific rulings that appear in this week’s portion were so revealed. That means that God’s authority is as much behind the prohibition of cursing one’s parents [Ex. 21.17] as it is in the Decalogue’s demand to honor them; it is as much behind the rules about accidental homicide [Ex. 21.13] and assault [Ex.21.18-25] as it is behind the Decalogue’s prohibition of murder; and it is as much behind this week’s rules about property damage and bailments as it is behind the Decalogue’s prohibition of theft, The many laws in this week’s portion may seem almost prosaic compared to the majestic and magisterial principles of the Decalogue, but God’s authority undergirds this week’s laws no less.

This has had an immense effect on our tradition. It has meant that as Israelites we are to understand what God wants of us in legal terms. Authority does not rest in our individual conscience, as it does for most Protestant denominations; it is not found in the decrees of a specific group of persons, as it is, for example, for Catholics; and it is not a function of the rule of the majority, as it is for democratic cultures such as that of the United States. For Judaism, instead, authority rests in the laws, and we are to use legal methods to apply them to new situations and generations.

Indeed, as the rabbis understood the Torah, God may be the creator of the law and its ultimate judge and enforcer, but after the Torah had been given, determining the substance of its rules was now out of God’s hands. “The law is not in heaven” [Deut. 30.12], the rabbis remind a heavenly voice that attempts to intrude on their decision-making, and God laughs in acquiescence and agreement [Bava Metzia 59b]. Authority, then rests not in individual conscience, a person or group of persons, or even God, but rather in the law itself. That bespeaks a remarkable sense of trust in the law as a source for human direction.

Using the law to determine what is right or wrong, what is required, forbidden, or optional, has some distinct advantages and disadvantages when compared to other possible methods of making such decisions. On the minus side, employing legal methods can, and sometimes does, leads to legalism, where people become too concerned with the details of the law to see its underlying goals. It can also freeze practices much too firmly such that needed changes are not made. For those who value autonomy, the legal method removes the authority to choose from the individual and places it in the hands of those empowered to interpret the law.

On the other hand, there are many benefits to deciding moral issues or, put theologically, to discerning what God wants of us through legal methods. For one, the law defines the scope of our moral duties. To take a simple example it may seem obvious that one has a moral duty to return a lost object, but exactly how far does that duty go? If you announce the find and nobody comes forward to claim it, do you need to take it home and store it? Do you need to advertise it in the newspaper? If it is an animal, do you need to feed it? If so, at whose expense? What if you are allergic to this kind of animal in the first place? You, after all, innocently were in the wrong place at the wrong time, and so when and where does your obligation cease? It is precisely this kind of specificity that the Israeli legal structure provides-in this case, in the second chapter Bava Metzia. Without it moral norms would be absolute and insatiable, making it impossible to fulfill them while still having a life.

Second, if everyone decides on his or her own, there are no barriers against totally outrageous decisions; each person’s sovereignty is often tantamount to each person’s foolishness. The legal method, in contrast, requires rabbis to justify their decisions in terms of the precedents and methods of the law before the public, who can read such justifications and argue with them. The whole community may be wrong, of course, but at least this way we each provide a check for each other’s poor judgments and outright the errors.

Third, if everyone decides maters on his own or her own, there is little chance to form shared norms. If those who know the law are entrusted to interpret and apply it, however, there can be a sense of community standards. Judges, of course, may differ with one another, but historically the Israeli tradition has devised methods-as has every living legal system-to determine which of several conflicting judicial opinions will be recognized as the law. Sometimes different communities follow different rulings, so that there is no universal Israeli practice; but at least portions of the Israeli people can be united into a group through common practices shaped by the law.

Fourth, the law acts to counter fads, for it takes some doing to change the received precedent. This is the opposite side of the point made earlier against the use of legal methods-namely, that sometimes the law does not change rapidly enough. That is true. The converse, however, is also true-namely, that moral rules should not be subject to instantaneous change. If moral rules are not simply going to condone whatever we want to do now, if they are indeed going to be normative, they must have some staying power. The legal method of handling moral issues, when used properly, provides for change, but by insisting that changes be justified legally, it protects us from changing standards too hastily. In so doing it preserves not only the normativity of norms, but also their-and the community’s-continuity.

Finally, while treating moral issues in legal terms entails the risk of legalism, it also provides the opportunity for love. Children who grow up in households with no rules do not experience that as love; they see it-correctly-as apathy (lack of interest, enthusiasm, or concern) on the part of the parents. Laying down rules-reasonable ones, of course, and reasonably enforced-is no less than the way in which parents express love for their children. Christian sources wrongly ignore this when they depict the Israeli commitment to the law as a preference for law over love. Quite the contrary; the law is the very vehicle of God’s love, as the paragraph before the Shema in the siddur, the traditional prayer book, indicates: “With everlasting love, You have loved the house of Israel, You have taught us Torah and commandments, statues and judicial rulings.”

As good as the law is, though, it is not, and cannot be, sufficient. Judaism put more trust in the law than perhaps any other religion or culture. Even American ideology, which also manifests a much larger degree of trust in law than the thought and practice of most other groups, finds it reprehensible, if not impossible, to legislate morality. Israeli law had no such qualms. Most of the norms that contemporary Americans would consider the realm of the moral as distinct from the legal, Israeli law has no difficulty putting into law even to the point of defining how much charity one must give and in what manner (see Maimonides, Mishnen Torah, Laws of Gifts to the Poor, Chapter 10) and how often a man must offer to have conjugal relations with his wife [Mishnah Ketubbot 5.6].

And yet even Israeli tradition recognizes that there is a realm of moral norms beyond the letter of the law. Indeed, the Mishnah maintains that to say that what is mine is mine and what is yours is yours, while just and even a fulfillment of the commandment of loving your neighbor as yourself [Lev. 19.18], is “the trait of Sodom” [Avot 5.10]; and according to the Talmud, we force Jews not to act that way [Eruvin 49a; Ketubbot 103a; Bava Batra 59a, 168a]. The law may define a good ideal of what we mean by the moral, and it may articulate even what we understood God to want of us in our own day, but there are still moral norm beyond its scope, a state that must be recognized and obeyed.

While we must recognize the limits of the law and the need to do the moral thing even beyond its demands, we must also understand and appreciate the important contributions it makes to our moral sensitivity and our knowledge of God’s will. We read the laws of this week’s portion, then with the awe of Sinai and the authority that that setting invokes as well as the gratitude appropriate to God for the Divine gift of these laws of love.

Shabbat Shalom!!!




LAST WEEK

Parshas Yitro 5782

'The Silence Voice'

20 Shevat 5782 / Jan. 22, Sat. 2021

By Rabbi Yitzhak Avraam

Let compare Moshe Rabbenu experience to that of Eliyahu Hanavi at Mt. Sinai aka Horeb: The mystery and awesome power of the revelation overwhelmed the Israelites at Sinai. On the third day… there war thunder and lightning…. Now Mount Sinai was all in smoke, for the Lord had come down upon it in fire; the smoke rose like the smoke of a kiln, and the whole mountain trembled violently. The blare of the horn grew louder and louder. As Moses spoke, God answered him in thunder [Ex. 19.16-19].

The Lord spoke these words… to your whole congregation at the mountain, with a mighty voice out of the fire and the dense clouds [Deut. 5.19].

So terrifying was the experience that the people who stood at Sinai appealed to Moses to intercede: "You speak to us…and we will obey; but let not God speak to us, lest we die" [Ex. 20.16]. God had made His presence manifest in such a way as to strike fear and trembling in the hearts of the people. They witnessed the greatest sound and light show ever. They were obviously impressed by God’s display of power. And they were convinced that God was Almighty. Or were they?

Curiously enough, when the smoking mountain once again provides the setting for a revelation-to Elijah this time-the supernatural elements are vigorously deemphasized. The event occurs following Elijah’s resounding defeat of the prophets of Ba’al on Mount Carmel when he is compelled to flee for his life [I Kings 19]. Passing into the wilderness, he walked forty days and forty nights as far as the mountain of God at Horeb. There he went into a cave and there he spent the night [I Kings 19. 8-9].

Elijah is drawn in the image of Moses. Not only is the sacred period of time duplicated, but so is the location; none other than Horeb-Sinai (in Exodus the mountain of the Lord bears the name Sinai; in Deuteronomy it is referred to as Horeb). Moreover, the midrash perceptively notes that the cave in which Elijah lodged when God was revealed to him at Horeb was the same as the one in which Moses concealed himself while God passed in review before him.

But it is at this juncture that the similarity is moderated and that Elijah’s encounter with God assumes its own singular character.

And lo, the Lord passed by. There was a great and mighty wind, splitting mountains and shattering rocks by the power of the Lord, but the Lord was not in the wind. After the wind an earthquake; but the Lord was not in the earthquake. After the earthquake fire; but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire- Kol demamah dakah (A still small voice) [I Kings 19.11-12].

There was indeed a thunderous wind [cf. Ex. 19.16] and a shuddering earthquake [cf. Ex. 19.16, 18] and a blazing fire [cf. Deut. 5.20]. Yet with a touch of irony the text impressively and repeatedly proclaims, but the Lord was not in the wind… in the earthquake… not in the fire. It is as if I Kings 19 serves as a commentary- perhaps even a critique- on Exodus 19 and Deuteronomy 5, in an effort to impart a grand lesson. God’s desire is that Elijah realize that the era of magic is coming to a close and that it is no longer necessary for God to "show off" in order to persuade people that there is a spiritual essence to their being. Elijah is herein reproached for having forced God’s hand at Mount Carmel [I Kings 18].

What hutzpah it was calling forth such a spectacular miracle (fire descending from God to burn the offerings that were set on an altar drenched with water). Henceforward, however, the prophet is not to teach by causing a cataclysmic eruption, but by using the word, by educating his listeners.

In fact, Rabbi Meir Leibush Malbim [On I Kings 19.11] suggests that Kol Demamah Dakah alludes to the fine (Dak) brightness in Ezekiel I from whose midst there was a "glow as amber" Hashmal, i.e., hash: silent, memalel: speech. In other words, Malbim says speaking, " speaking in silent whispers and nor with noisy diatribes is the only course that will bring true illumination."

Not only is the old "wow ’em" mode adjudged to be religiously offensive, but it is viewed as harmful to one’s spiritual development and an ineffective means of nurturing a deep relationship not religion with God. Rabbi Menahem Mendel of Kotzk was aware that already at Sinai the people were seduced by material attractions. Commenting on the phrase All the people saw the sounds [Ex. 20.15], he writes: "The people were looking at the external manifestations: the thunder, the lightning, etc." The possibility of worshiping a golden calf is thus implicit in the Sinaitic experience. Indeed, it was not too far into the future before it became a reality.

There will always be children who require absolute proof of God’s presence, who demand certainty and who are galvanized by outpourings of fire and brimstone. There will always be religious idolaters. But the mature individual, exhibiting insight and a refined spiritual sensibility, understands that a storming wind, a crashing earthquake, and a flashing fire are only partitions that mask the holy.

For God sends the prophets to approach the people with the sounds of silence and thus attract them with bonds of love and gentle words. It is not through the harsh sounds of authoritarianism, but rather through the soft tones of reason, through modeling, through patience and relationship, through all the processes and silences that punctuate the spiritual dialogue that genuine learning unfolds. Unto you silence is praise [Ps. 65.2], the sounds of silence- Kol Demamah Dakah.

Shabbat Shalom!!!




Summer Activities

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hanukkah poster

Winter Activities

You are all warmly invited to celebrate with we us the feast of Hanukkah. Please check the poster below.


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Previous Activities

Three ways to contribute

Please choose one that fit you the best

In Prayer

Your prayer matter

Kehilat Beta Yisrael synagogue ask for your continue fervent pray in our support as we follow YeshuaHaMashiach(the living Torah).


As your synagogue community we want you to feel at ease, supported, cared for and spiritually satisfied. This is our promise to everyone who engages with Kehilat Beta Yisrael for anyone of the life cycle events you choose to have with us.

Our Rabbi Yitzhak Ben Avraam is available to provide guidance whether it be for a joyous occasion or for times which involve crises.


If you know of someone who needs to speak with our Rabbi, or if you want to add a name to the Mi Sheberach list/prayer for healing, please contact us by:

514-918-5840

info.kehilat.beta.yistael@gmail.com

Materially

Things needed

The mission of Kehilat Beta Yisrael synagogue is to create a community where all Beta Yisrael, other Jews and the nations of all background celebrate and perpetuate the way of the Torah in their life, home and in their respective nations. Through support, tzedakah, education and observance.


We kindly ask you to supports our synagogue family spiritually, materially and socially; to enrich its members with Jewish education, encourage religious observances, Jewish home practices, attendance at services and supports and encourages youth activities and Shabbat children school.






Financially

Free will donation

Has KBY helped you in your faith in Yeshua? in this case, would you consider supporting this ministry so we dan provide more articles, do further research, produce more videos, start a radio show, and develop ministries in different cities, provinces, countries?

To all our donors and to everyone that’s been touch in one way or the other through our prayers and mission we at KBY want to say thank you so much for your financial support and time given to our Synagogue.

KBY does not take your synagogue payment as a monthly bill or a monthly dues because they’re nothing that is “DUE” but rather as an investment into the present and future of a common cause in which we all as a member believe.

We truly know that you’re giving a big chunk of your discretionary income for this common cause and believe so therefore we really appreciate your contributions/freewill donation and with a sense of gratitude KBY is very thankful.

You can donate In Canadian Dollar, US Dollar, Paypal or Credit Card Thankyou!


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Community

Further Details



Code of conduct
Kehilat Beta Yisrael Synagogue (Behaviour)

Therefore to him that knoweth to do good and doeth it not, to him it is sin. It is the responsibility of members of Kehilat Beta Yisrael to ensure that the synagogue is an ethical stronghold in all its pursuits and dealings. Members should be guided by kedushah (holiness) in promoting the synagogue's mission of having personal relationship with the Holy One (Blessed be He) and sustaining Judaism. Their role is that of managing the sacred, by bringing vision, wisdom and dedication to their commitment and our holy Congregation. In doing so; they are expected to adhere to the following principles:

Shabbat Observance:
All Kehilat Beta Yisrael Synagogue members and staff shall observe the principles teach by the Torah and those pertaining to Shabbat observance (including arrival prior to Shabbat service and all synagogue event or services, as well as refraining from the use of electronic devices during Shabbat or Yom Tov services); all males must wear Kippot during all services and meals, and Tallit/Tefillin for morning services, where appropriate. Every female most wear the head cover during the Shabbat and all holidays service. The Kehilat Beta Yisrael Synagogue member Dress Code will be observed at all times.

Expectations:

  • Gain spiritual and personal growth in relationship with the Most High;

  • Serve as role models;

  • Act as advocates and positive spokespersons for the synagogue;

  • Embrace tzedakah (righteous action).

Accountability:

  • Uphold Torah values such as fairness, derech Eretz (respectful engagement), mutual respect, sensitivity and openness;

  • Act with personal honesty and integrity;

  • Preserve the dignity of the synagogue, its members and those who serve it;

  • Support the daily work of the Congregation and its leadership;

  • Maintain a safe, warm and welcoming environment.

Communication and Confidentiality:

  • Refrain from breaking the Torah laws of la-shonharah (idle gossip or slanderous talk)

  • Respect the privacy of others (Remember that your right stop where the right of other begin)

  • Communicate openly and truthfully

  • Express constructively, and address to the appropriate party any discussions of policy, positions, programs or individuals

  • Ensure that disagreement relate only to principles and priorities, not personalities

Respect for Others

  • Ensure that everyone involved in synagogue life is treated with kavod (respect);

  • Enable those who are connected with synagogue life to reach their highest potential;

  • Teach that all are created b’tzelem Elohim (in the image of God) and that come with a great sense of honour, responsibility and a privilege;

  • Remember and remind others that the goals are relationship with the Holy One (Blessed be He), unity, not uniformity nor religiosity;

  • Ensure that boundaries, prerogatives and expertise are respected.

The privileges and benefits bestowed upon members are a blessing, creating the opportunity for personal growth through commitment to the Jewish community. By living a committed Torah based life, each of us can improve while contributing to tikkun-olam (repair of the world).

Oneg Shabbat

On every Shabbat after the service we host a community Oneg. It is led by our kitchen committee within The KBY Sisterhood. If you are visiting for the first time, you are not required to bring food. Simply enjoy the fellowship. Our gatherings are vegetarian, dairy and kosher meats. For those attending service regularly, please see Claudia if you will like to bring food to help contribute to the oneg. If you do not keep kosher but still would like to help-or cannot cook we will give you a list of kosher items that may be purchased from the store on your behalf to contribute. You may also give freely to the oneg fund by marking your tithe envelope and placing it inside of the donation boxes. For more information please see Rebbetzin or Madam Claudia.

Children Torah Class

If you have children and you intend to come with them, we have classes only during regular services on Shabbat. The age range for classes during shabbat services are 1 yr olds-11 yrs old. Children within the ages of 3months along with the mother and 1yr can attend class as long as they are potty trained and can verbally let the teachers know that they need to go to the washroom.

  • Children 3 yrs old and under WHO ARE NOT potty trained, meet in the “Kid Zone” in the back area for supervised play time only with their parents or guardians.

  • There is also a nursery upstairs for nursing and sleeping babies as well as a full kitchen to prep food.
    Sometimes when the weather permits, the teachers will take the children outside to the park or backyard to play.
    If you do not want your child to participate, please let the teachers know when you drop them off.

  • If your child has an allergy or medical condition please speak with the teachers as well.

  • Bring snacks for your child, they will get hungry before the day is over, especially if we have long services or events.
    Bring extra clothes/diapers & wipes, etc. When in need or caught off guard, please see another mom or the Rebbetzin for help. Almost any mom attending will have extra supplies.

  • Teachers will not help your children in the washroom due to privacy laws. Ushers or Assistant Teachers may get you to help your child in the washroom. Please be prepared for this inadvance.

  • Do not allow your children to play outside without supervision, especially near cars. We do not any accidents.

Women Group (Sisterhood)

Women are unique and wonderfully created by G-d. Proverbs 31:10-11 “A woman of valor who can find, she is worth far more than precious jewels. The heart of her husband safely trusts in her, and he profits greatly thereby.” Women live complex lives full of ups and downs, yet they can make a huge difference in the world around them, be it at home or at the shul and at society at large. KBY sisterhood understands these challenges and they offer real-life support to those striving to maintain life’s balance. Most importantly KBY seek to lead women to a personal relationship with the H-ly One. Our Women’s Missionary helps to extend G-d’s love through support for those in need through prayer support and other forms of assistance. While our Girls Night Out provides a way for ladies from all stages of life to share, to challenge, to love and to support one another in a fun and relax way, away from daily routine.

Men Group (Brotherhood)

The objective of our brotherhood ministry dedicated to men is to disciple and equip our male members in their roles as men of G-d, whether married, single, older, younger in responsibilities to their spouse, family, KBY, the society and the country at large . Our men meeting (Shacharit), which gathers monthly, also opens the opportunity to discuss the forward development of the synagogues.



Community (Continued)

Bulletin

We provide a flyer in the back of all chairs in the sanctuary that details our modesty and shul rules and this can also be found in our code of conduct. Please refer to that flyer when visiting.

Rabbi Services

Rav. Yitzhak Avraam is trained in the following fields:

  • Individual counseling

  • Family counseling

  • Counseling in the most difficult moment of life

  • Pre and marital counseling

  • Addiction counseling


Other services perform by the Rabbi include:

  • Bar / Bat Mitzvah

  • Performing Marriages for Jews, non-Jews and
    inter-faiths couple.

Counseling

For a special or emergency counseling please don’t hesitate to contact the Rabbi.

Bar / Bat Mitzvah

Bar/Bat Mitzvah celebration can be arranged in Synagogue upper level. Please contact Rebbetzin for more Info.

Marriage

Marriage ceremony can be perform in the synagogue. For more info don’t hesitate to contact Rebbetzin.

Events

Latest Events

Happy Yom T’rooah / Rosh Hashana 2019 – 5780!!

I just want to use this opportunity to thank each and every one of us for coming out en masse for this year Yom T’rooah/Roch Hashanah service. It was really great and nice to see everyone plus tons of new faces and family, frankly speaking I was very blessed and proud of you all for pronouncing […]

Weekly Activities

Shabbat


Erev Shabbat:
Every Friday after Sunset
Shabbat Morning Service:
starting exactly @10:30am every Saturday
Blowing of the Shofar
Meet, greeting and Aaronic Benediction

Information Visitors

Here are the information about our community so that you can be comfortable
when visiting with us:

Parking

Since our Shul is located on Saint-Michel Boulevard, the new facility has free parking available for everyone.

Cameras & Recording

KBY do not allow for taping of our services or photos to be taken while service is occurring. However, we do allow photos during special ceremonies, honors and performances such at Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, concerts, baby dedications and award ceremonies.


Modest dressing code

KBY is a traditional Jewish and Messianic believers worship center, therefore our community etiquette reflects this:

  • Women do not wear men’s kippot & tallit but can wear a ladies’ head covering in the form of a scarf or hat.

  • When men approach the bema, they are to wear full-length pants and shirts not shorts or short sleeves.

  • Men wear kippot on the bema, especially when reading from the Torah. We have guest kippot in the lobby for your convenience.

  • Traditionally, women do not read from the Torah, but can read from the Writings and Messianic written during service. If you are called to read, a head covering is located at the bema for you to wear when reciting scripture and blessing before/after the reading.

  • The Rabbi will not meet with women alone and will always have a witness available during appointments or prayer with a member of the opposite sex.


  • The same goes for any of our leadership at KBY. Men pray with men and the women are prayed over by women leaders.
    Thank you for visiting KBY as we look forward to your presence at our service.

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Free will donation


Has KBY helped you in your faith in Yeshua? in this case, would you consider supporting this ministry so we dan provide more articles, do further research, produce more videos, start a radio show, and develop ministries in different cities, provinces, countries?

To all our donors and to everyone that’s been touch in one way or the other through our prayers and mission we at KBY want to say thank you so much for your financial support and time given to our Synagogue. KBY does not take your synagogue payment as a monthly bill or a monthly dues because they’re nothing that is “DUE” but rather as an investment into the present and future of a common cause in which we all as a member believe. We truly know that you’re giving a big chunk of your discretionary income for this common cause and believe so therefore we really appreciate your contributions / freewill donation and with a sense of gratitude KBY say THANK YOU.

You can donate In Canadian Dollar, US Dollar, Paypal or Credit Card. Thankyou!

I just want to use this opportunity to thank each and every one of us for coming out en masse for this year Yom T’rooah/Roch Hashanah service. It was really great and nice to see everyone plus tons of new faces and family, frankly speaking I was very blessed and proud of you all for pronouncing […]

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